War Bug

War Bug

Book Club Questions

  1. What was your experience of War Bug? Did the story grab you immediately, or did it take a while to hook you? What did you think of the chapters alternating between 1862 and 2022? At what point in the book were you the most engaged?
  1. What feelings did the book evoke: Curiosity, fear, sympathy, compassion, anger, frustration, anxiety, hope, or something else? Where did you feel there were connections between the struggles of the Civil War era and today? What three words would you use to describe the book?
  1. Which character seemed the most real to you: Ann Bagley, Harley Camden, Samuel Bagley, Nanette Glebesman, Bushrod Washington, Juan Erazo, Abigail Washington, Abdul Ali, or another character? Describe their personalities and their motivations. Do their actions make sense, and are they justified? Why or why not?
  1. How do the main characters grow and change over the course of the book? What do they learn about themselves and the world around them? How did the characters affect each other? Where did you see similarities between the characters and real people you know?
  1. How would you describe the plot? Was it driven more by events or by the interaction between characters? How would you describe the pace of the book? Were you surprised by its twists and turns, or was it predictable? Did the book end the way you expected? Was it satisfying? If not, how would you change it?
  1. Where did the book make connections between twenty-first-century Occoquan and nineteenth-century Occoquan? What did you learn about the Civil War, and how do your discoveries help you to understand what is going on in the United States today?
  1. What main ideas does Henry Brinton explore, and how does the title War Bugconnect to these ideas? How are faith convictions important to the message of the book? How did you find yourself challenged, politically or spiritually?
  1. What passage moved you or struck you as profound, if any? Where did you find a section of dialogue that was amusing or touching? Was there a section that captured the book’s main idea in a particularly effective way? What moment came as a complete surprise to you?
  1. What, if anything, set this book apart from other works of historical fiction? How did it compare to others you have read? Would you recommend this book to other readers? Why or why not?
  1. What were you still wondering about at the end of the book? If you could ask Henry Brinton a single question, what would it be?